Rashid Khalily

Rashid Khalily

 

Dr Khalily graduated from Khyber college of Dentistry, Pakistan in 2008. Following his graduation he completed 2 years post graduate  training for his Membership with College Of Physician and Surgeons Pakistan in the specialty of Periodontology.

 

In Dec 2012 he was awarded Membership from Faculty of Dentistry Royal College of Surgeons Ireland (MFD-RCSI).

 

He has worked as a General Dental Practitioner in Pakistan at The Clinic of Esthetic Dentistry for several years. In July 2015 he passed the exam for registration with The Dental council of Ireland with the intention of moving to Ireland.

 

In order to pursue his career in Restorative and Esthetic Dentistry, in January 2017 he enrolled in a four year Master of Dental surgery (MDS) program in the specialty of operative dentistry from Islamabad Pakistan.

 

Dr Khalily’s objective is to learn and acquire valuable insight into latest clinical procedures. He attended numerous courses with special interest in the field of Restorative dentistry.

 

With his ability to learn fast, work hard with commitment, dedication to his patients and meticulous approach towards the clinical procedures and past experience, he joins our Pembroke Dental Team to embark on his professional career here in Ireland. We are delighted to welcome him.

Waseem Gohar

Five Minutes with Dr. Waseem Gohar, General Dentist

 

Where did you start your dentistry career?

I started my formal dentistry career in The University Dental Hospital in sunny Dubai after graduating with a Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD) degree from Hungary. Having been away from my family during undergraduate years, I wanted to spend some time with them in Dubai before I embarked on my journey to work in Ireland.

I spent the following months as a dental intern in different departments of dentistry gaining indispensable skills from the specialists in the hospital. During this time, I also completed Part 1 of Membership of Faculty of Dentistry postgraduate examination from Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (MFD RCSI). I intend to take Part 2 of this examination imminently.

Dubai is a home to over 200 nationalities, so meeting new people and understanding different culture has strengthened my communication skills, which is an important aspect of dentistry.

 

What do you enjoy most about dentistry and how do you spend your spare time?

The beauty of being a dentist is this- every day is different, each patient presents a unique challenge, keeping you motivated. You never get bored or have a mundane day at work. I enjoy all things dentistry, from meeting and greeting my patients to the treatment procedure itself but my particular interest lies in Endodontics or root canal treatment.

I am an avid reader and gym enthusiast; I spend my spare time reading psychological thrillers, weightlifting, and occasionally dabbling in cardiovascular exercise.

 

What is the last thing you have done to improve your skills/knowledge?

I keep myself up to date with contemporary literature, reading scientific articles, attend courses and live webinars to provide the best possible treatment to my patients. I recently attended a webinar hosted by an endodontist from the UK titled ‘Introduction to a Perfect Root Canal Treatment’ which was excellent as I can apply those skills into my daily practice. I follow dentists from all over the world on social media to learn different tips and tricks. As a healthcare professional, simply put, the learning never stops.

 

 

Why is the routine dental health check so important?

Changes to teeth happen on both macro and microscopic levels. As dentists we are trained to detect both during a routine dental health check. There are tests and tools at our disposal such as X-rays which can aid our diagnosis. During regular visits, the changes can be detected early and treated in the initial stages before they have had the chance to deteriorate. For example, the presence of tartar or calculus, a tenacious hard plaque deposit which develops slowly over time and is adhered strongly to the teeth which can cause gum disease cannot be removed at home with toothbrushing. It requires cleaning with our ultrasonic scaler performed at a dental clinic. Dentist can further evaluate your overall oral health and guide on how to improve it, if needed. In the long run, regular visits are more cost-effective and contribute to your overall general wellbeing.

 

Should I use mouthwash regularly?

 

The one thing that should not be regularly used in an oral care regime is Mouthwash. In simple terms, our mouth or oral cavity has both friendly and harmful bacteria -we want to lessen the harmful bacteria while encouraging the friendly bacteria. Unfortunately, mouthwash is 100% antibacterial and cannot distinguish between the two. Recent studies have shown that people who use mouthwash twice a day for a certain period are at 55% higher risk of developing pre-diabetes or diabetes. No concrete reason for this has been found yet.

The American Dental Association suggests the use of mouthwash for therapeutic use or symptomatic relief, for instance, in the treatment of bleeding gums under the prescription of a dentist. Toothbrushing, manual or electrical for 2 minutes twice a day and daily flossing is absolutely sufficient for maintenance of good oral hygiene without the use of any mouthwash.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Bishoy Wanis

 

Where did you start your dentistry career, Bishoy?

 

 

I started my dental career in New Zealand as an Oral Health Therapist (Dental Therapist and Dental Hygienist). I worked as a therapist for just over 3 years, and that clinical experience in dentistry is what made me realise that my true passion does lie within this field and made me pursue further studies to become a dentist.

 

 

What do you enjoy most about dentistry and how do you spend your spare time?

 

 

What I love about dentistry is how life changing the best quality dental care can make to my patients lives and confidence, especially if I have provided their care! The biggest reward for me is the smile of a satisfied patient leaving the clinic happy!

When I am not practicing dentistry, I enjoy playing video games, working out at the gym, reading a bit of dental literature, and having some social drinks with friends.

 

 

What is the last thing you have done to improve your skills/knowledge?

 

 

In this field it’s very important to keep up to date with the literature as technology and treatment modalities are constantly changing and updating. I attend online webinars regularly and especially during the Covid-19 pandemic I have had a great opportunity to attend several online webinars and conferences. In 2019, I also attended a course (both theoretical as well as practical) on advanced prosthodontic treatment planning for crowns, bridges, and veneers.

 

 

Why is the routine dental health check so important?

 

 

There is a saying that goes “the oral cavity is the window to a person’s health” which I believe is very true, as several systemic diseases can manifest in the mouth (cancers, Diabetes Mellitus, even heart issues). Good maintenance of overall health and having regular dental health checks can be a turning point for any individual suffering from chronic diseases like Diabetes Mellitus and help them have more control over these health issues. Certain conditions can be diagnosed early during the routine screening that your dentist performs during a dental health check who will refer you to your doctor for further investigating if necessary. So, we don’t just check the health of your teeth and gums, but we also want to make sure you are enjoying a healthy+++ quality of life!

 

 

Why are my gums bleeding?

 

 

Many people suffer from bleeding gums for a very common reason: Gingivitis caused by dental plaque bacteria accumulating on teeth and gums. Almost anyone and everyone suffers from gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) at some stage in their life, and although it does not cause any pain to the point where seeking dental care becomes urgent, it can slowly make the gums weaker and erode the bone holding teeth firm (advanced gum inflammation, aka Periodontitis) and that can affect how long the teeth remain in the mouth as well. This is why it is very important to brush your teeth twice daily and floss at least once daily to remove plaque deposits in order to ensure that we not only maintain good health of our teeth from decay, but also from gum disease!

 

What is your top tip for oral health?

 

Brush and floss your teeth daily! It can make a huge difference in your daily life having a fresh breath, a healthy smile, and definitely need some good back teeth if you enjoy having a good steak every now and then like myself!

 

Dr. Pavly Hanna

Five Minutes with Dr. Pavly Hanna, General Dentist 

 

 

  1. Where did you start your dental career? 

 

Without a doubt, dentistry is a passion of mine! In my home country of Canada, after curiosity visits to the dentist as a young child and ultimately achieving an improved smile, I had grown a keen interest and desire of becoming a Dentist. The combination of practical skill, patient connection and logical thinking was a perfect fit for me.

 

With that, I had attended Dental school in Poland and was awarded with a Doctor of Medicine in Dentistry (DMD) degree in 2019. Following graduation, I  spent several months working alongside various Dentists in the UK as well as in Canada, broadening my dental scope of practice.

 

 

  1. What do you enjoy most about Dentistry and how do you spend your spare time?

 

What I enjoy most about Dentistry is the relationship and trust that is built with my patients. Having the ability to improve one’s oral health and assisting them achieve the confidence-improving smile which they deserve is very fulfilling. Additionally, the gratitude and appreciation received in return from patients is incredibly rewarding.

 

In my spare time away from the dental chair, I enjoy travelling, photography, listening to music, playing basketball and simply hanging out with family and friends.

 

 

  1. What is the last thing you have done to improve your skills/knowledge? 

 

As life never stops teaching, I believe that learning should likewise never stop. Being fortunate enough of having a career in the healthcare profession, it is important that one constantly educates themselves with the latest information and technology so as to offer the greatest standard of care possible.

 

In the field of Dentistry, I constantly try my best to better educate myself through continuing dental education courses. Recently, I had completed a 5-month comprehensive course covering dental related subjects which has further enhanced my fundamental knowledge.

 

 

 

  1. What would you say is your dental philosophy? 

 

My dental philosophy is that the foundation for good oral health is based on the prevention of oral disease together with mutual trust, communication, respect and understanding. I believe that this is necessary for the success of the treatment and to accomplish the desires of patients. I am devoted to providing the greatest standard of dental care I can to ensure that each dental visit is as smile-filled and comfortable as possible. I take pride in building a mutual trust with patients as well as educating them on how to maintain a healthy mouth to prevent oral diseases.

 

 

 

  1. Why is fluoride important for teeth?

 

The strength of our teeth is derived from minerals which is vital for healthy teeth. Did you know that the outer layer of our teeth, the enamel, is the strongest and most mineralized substance in the entire body? Despite this, with poor oral hygiene, poor dietary habits along with other factors, the enamel is subject to a loss of minerals. This may ultimately weaken the tooth and make it more vulnerable to cavities and decay.

 

An integral solution to this is by restoring the lost minerals with the use of fluoride. Incorporating fluoride has many benefits as it also contributes to fighting the harmful oral bacteria and prevent dental cavities. Fluoridated dental products come in different sources including toothpastes, mouth rinses, gels, varnishes, and prescribed supplements. Practicing proper oral hygiene measures containing fluoride can help preserve the strength of your teeth and ensure a long-lasting, healthy smile.

 

 

 

  1. Does Vaping affect my oral health?

 

Similar to cigarette tobacco smoking, e-cigarette vaping devices have negative effects not only to the heart and lungs but also on teeth and overall oral health. Vaping devices contain chemicals such as nicotine and propylene glycol which may cause plaque accumulation, staining, bad breath and dry mouth further leading to cavities and gum disease. Long term use may play a role in causing advanced damage such as periodontal disease and tooth loss.

 

If you vape, it is important to try and limit your nicotine intake, maintain proper oral hygiene and visit your dentist on a regular basis in order to timely control the harmful oral effects of vaping.

Be sure to speak to your Dentist or other healthcare provider for further assistance about habit alternatives to help minimize the use of vaping and its associated side effects.

 

Dr Aditya Vickram, BDS, MFD,RCSI

Aditya is an experienced and skillful dentist, hailing originally from India. He has worked in Ireland and the UK for over 15 years with particular emphasis in Oral Surgery procedures. He enjoys general dental practice, but his main area of interest is in Oral Surgery and Dental Implants. His interest in surgery and dental implants led him to do courses in Switzerland for Implant dentistry.

Dental Implants are the efficient and modern way to replace teeth which have been removed/lost for various reasons like decay, trauma and also for  patients who have difficulty wearing dentures etc. The success rate of Dental Implants is now known to be 98% over 25 to 30 years so they are recognised as the ideal solution for missing teeth.

Aditya enjoys delivering high quality personalised treatment plans for patients which needs meticulous planning and time. He is continually involved in professional development by attending seminars and conferences.

He is a calm and kind dentist with a good sense of humour. His hobbies include hiking, surfing travelling and …dentistry!

 

Why did you join Pembroke Dental, Adi?

 

I joined Pembroke Dental as it is a very modern practice with the latest technology and equipment available which helps the dental practitioners to provide best quality care to patients. It has also an excellent support system for both patients and staff members which I admire.

Dr Lina Shams

With special interest in Oral Surgery

 

 

Where did you start your dentistry career?

 

 

  After graduating from the Faculty of Dentistry in Egypt in 2011, I spent one year of postgraduate training in the University Hospital to further enhance my dental skills and knowledge. After that valuable year, I worked as a general dentist for 2 years in general practice .During this period I finished my Membership of the Royal College of Ireland [MFD] and decided that I would like to follow my interest in oral surgery.

 I joined the oral and maxillofacial surgery team in the Ministry of Health hospital in KSA[Kingdom of Saudi Arabia]. I gained a lot of specific experience in oral surgery and was awarded my postgraduate oral surgery diploma in 2017.

 I was then accepted to join the Master of oral and maxillofacial surgery training program back in Egypt and I continued to work in a private practice doing general dentistry as well as my hospital position until  I got the opportunity to work for Pembroke Dental.

 

 

What do you enjoy most about dentistry and how do you spend your spare time?

 

I enjoy helping anxious patients to have their dental treatment without fear and try to meet their expectations of a healthy attractive smile. I get great satisfaction in fulfilling my patients expectations, be it providing the simplest or the most complex treatments-I do value feedback and continually try to improve my interactions with my patients to make their dental treatment comfortable and a pleasant experience.

 In my spare time I like going out for a walk & exercising, also I like cooking and listening to different kinds of music.

 

 

What is the last thing you have done to improve your skills/knowledge?

 

I regularly attend courses and workshops to keep up to date and to improve my knowledge and skills. I am continuing my Masters training program in Oral Surgery and I read the latest research in different fields of dentistry.

 

 

What do you suggest for nervous patients who needs to see a dentist but are too nervous?

 

Talk to your dentist, the right dentist will know that your nervousness can be an important barrier to confidence and health. Morning appointments will be better to help handle stress-we are all less tired. Limit all caffeine before your appointment because it can increase anxiousness. Do not worry, we now have many solutions to calm nervousness -from the simple, such as helpful supportive dental teams to full sedation options.  We need to take the time to talk to you about your needs and assess what is the right approach for you as an individual.

 

 

What is tooth sensitivity and why do I have it?

 

 Tooth sensitivity is pain or discomfort in the teeth as a response to certain stimulations such as variations in temperature, hot or cold foodstuffs/drinks and sometimes sweet substances. It can be temporary or lingering, severe or mild in nature and can affect one tooth or several teeth-but one thing is certain, it can be very uncomfortable.

The most common causes can be gum recession or loss/thinning of the enamel outer layer of teeth which are typically due to either brushing too hard or grinding your teeth. But it can also  be due to dental caries and cavities which needs  immediate treatment so it is best to come in and visit your dentist for a dental health check to exclude any serious dental issues before trying any home remedies.

Dr. Raphaelle Cuisinier

 

 

Where did you start your dentistry career ?

 

 

I started my career 4 years ago when I graduated from dental college in France. I worked in Strasbourg which is  my hometown initially. The city is situated along the Rhine River in the east part of France and is well known for its Franco-Germanic culture.

Born in a family of dentists, I knew what to expect from a working point of view by remaining in France and I was ready for some adventure.

So, I took the decision of getting out of my comfort zone and coming to Ireland, where everything was new even the language!

I have not regretted my decision.

 

 

What do you enjoy the most about dentistry and how do you spend your spare time ?

 

 

I love the opportunity to interact with people every working day.

I feel that in most encounters we have with patients, we are helping them, to some extent.

A successful root treatment or filling can help to remove pain; a denture may help people eat foods they may previously have struggled with. Even if it’s simply a clean, scale and polish at a routine dental visit, we are helping people’s health.

 

How I spend my spare time really depends on my mood and energy levels. On some days I feel

great and try to organize something with my friends, or go to the gym or just walk around enjoying

the sunshine.

On some other days, however, I am tired. That’s the time to just relax at home by reading a book

or watch a movie, or even take a nap.

 

 

What is the last thing you have done to improve your skills/knowledge ?

 

 

Last year I attended a course in France about dermal fillers.

It is always nice to mix up with my peers, to exchange about new skills and their vision of dentistry.

Dermal fillers are part of aesthetic medicine and very complementary to dental treatment.

We as dentists give injections all the time – this is just learning how to give another kind of injection that is outside the mouth but is in the same area of the face that we inject all the time.

We also have a distinct advantage over dermatologists, plastic surgeons, medical aestheticians, and nurses who commonly provide these procedures in that we can deliver profound local anaesthesia in these areas before accomplishing these filler procedures, like we do every day for dental treatments.

 

 

Why should I floss ?

 

 

Flossing is an essential part of caring for your teeth and gums, and is the ideal tool for accessing all those difficult areas missed during tooth brushing.

Regardless of how often you brush your teeth, those hard-to-reach places in between your teeth will trap bacteria and microorganisms.

 

Flossing helps you remove debris that would otherwise build up and turn into harmful dental plaque which in turn hardens onto teeth and forms tartar.

The build-up of plaque and tartar can do serious damage to your teeth and gums. It can lead to gum disease, which is the infection and inflammation of your gums, eventually leading to erosion of the supporting bone around teeth.

 

There is no arguing that flossing can help reduce the risk of gingivitis, gum disease and the risk of tooth decay. It is a recommended part of a daily oral healthcare regime.

 

 

Why are my gums bleeding ?

 

 

Bleeding gums are one of the most common signs that something is wrong in your mouth.

There are few different reasons that your gums may be bleeding.

First of all, if you’re brushing too hard or you’re using a toothbrush that’s is too strong for your gums, try to ease up on the brushing or consider choosing a softer toothbrush and see if the bleeding stops.

If you gums are still bleeding, there are other issues to consider.

 

Gingivitis causes your gum to bleed because plaque and bacteria cause swelling and infection in the gums. It is one of the most common reasons for bleeding gums. Gingivitis is the first reversible stage of gum disease.

 

Certain medications thin your blood, causing you to bleed easier.  If you’ve noticed that your gums started bleeding around the same time you started a new mediation, the new drug may be at fault. Check with your doctor or dentist to see if your medication has this side effect.

 

Many women experience bleeding gums while they are pregnant because of the change in hormones. during your pregnancy, you may need to take additional steps to maintain proper oral hygiene. Normally, this increased bleeding settles after a few months post-partum but if the bleeding is excessive or worrisome any stage in pregnancy, come and visit your dentist. Dentistry is perfectly safe during pregnancy!

 

 

Dr Mehwish Mansoor

‘I am a compassionate dentist with more than ten years of experience in working as a dental surgeon in general dental practice.
I am proficient in all fields of dentistry but have a particular interest in paediatric children’s dentistry ,preventative dentistry and dental counselling.
I pride myself on making my patients fully comfortable before embarking on any treatment to make them totally at ease during a dental visit.’

 

Five Minutes with Dr Mehwish Mansoor, Dentist

 

1. Where did you start your dentistry career?

My journey as a dentist started when I graduated in the city of Lahore in Pakistan from the oldest and most prestigious dental school there. We had a wide variety of patients coming in from all parts of the country. I did my first clinical internship in the public hospital associated with our dental school. It was a very exciting opportunity for a young graduate like me, albeit one that carried an enormous responsibility. After twelve months of working in all the different disciples of dentistry, I started working in a private clinic that was owned by one of our teachers.

Fast forward many years and I moved to Ireland where a whole new world opened to me, regarding not only dentistry but also in the form of a very inviting and inclusive culture and people. It has been a very happening journey and sometimes I am surprised myself when I think of the young and clueless teenage girl roaming in huge corridors of the age old building of Demontmorency Institute of Dental Sciences after clearing all the requisite exams to be there.

 

2. What do you enjoy most about dentistry and how do you spend your spare time?

I enjoy all aspects of general routine dentistry but there are certainly a few things about my profession that I particularly enjoy. There is a sense of accomplishment in helping people and I am very fortunate that dentistry is one of the few professions where rewards go beyond monetary, you get to connect with people on their level and help remove their pain or discomfort. At the end of each day, nothing satisfies you more completely than being of use to another human being.

Secondly, I particularly enjoy the emphasis on prevention and disease control that has been put on oral health in the recent years. In the 80s and 90s, dentistry was more about treating the disease after it has occurred. Now we have evolved into professionals who can prevent a vast majority of oral and dental health issues by preventative measures. This saves a huge amount of time, money and discomfort in the later years. I love educating people about their oral health so they can see dentists as allies who will work with them to avoid most of the dental health problems, and treat the ones that are remaining in the most minimally invasive manner possible.

Regarding my spare time, I have been an avid reader all my life. Nothing is as relaxing at the end of a long day as a book. I also have two young boys and most of my time is spent tearing them away from their gadgets so we can read, draw, play, walk and cook together. Growing up, my favorite sport was badminton and I still love any chance I can get to take the rackets out, weather permitting, of course.

 

3. What is that last thing you have done to improve your skills/knowledge?

Like all professional fields, it is vital that we keep learning in dentistry too so our knowledge and skills are up to date. I very regularly attend Royal College Intensive Revision Courses that gathers all the professors and masters in the different fields of dentistry to get on one forum and teach the current best practices in their field of expertise.

I have also attended hands on refresher courses in the Dublin Dental Hospital to improve my clinical skills. The feedback that you get from the teachers and seniors there plays a big role in improving your work.

 

4. How do you suggest for a nervous patent who needs to see a dentist but is too nervous?

I understand that a lot of people have the nagging feeling that they need to see a dentist but they may have some fears, for example of pain, judgement or a horrible diagnosis. What I would suggest them firstly is that there is nothing unusual about it. It is perfectly normal to be afraid of dentists, sometimes our previous experiences also factor in to our fears. However, you need to visualise your first appointment as just the knowing process, both of the dentist and and his opinion about your teeth and discussion and planning of all the available treatment options.

Dentistry has advanced by leaps and bounds in recent years and patients are explained each and every step of their treatment plan. We want your treatment to be as painless as possible and for you to be as comfortable as possible so your appointments are happy, pleasant and productive for both of us. We also prefer minimally invasive treatments and maximum preservation of your teeth and supporting structures. There is no judgement in a dental clinic, just friendly professionals who would love to see you and your family smile their best.

 

5. What makes Pembroke dental a great place to work?

Pembroke Dental has to be one of the best dental practices in this country to work in. The sense of camaraderie and teamwork makes everything easier. Everyone looks out for their colleagues and take pride and joy in each other’s accomplishments. Dentistry itself can be somewhat of a lonely experience in some workplaces, but not Pembroke. This place is bustling with life and activity and there is always a friendly ear around if you need it. Also, the presence of so many specialists and general dental practitioners under one roof makes the brain storming of ideas and continual learning a daily part of our professional lives.

 

6. How can I get my kids to brush their teeth?

As a mother I can fully appreciate how hard it can be to get our children into these small daily habits. There is a lot of patience and consistency needed to get them to brush their teeth thoroughly and regularly. Up until the age of 7 years, you need to be helping them do it properly, especially regarding cleaning the back teeth well. Kids don’t really have enough manual dexterity to reach all the nook and crannies of their mouth where most of the sweet and sticky stuff is quite possibly lurking around.

From seven, you can gradually hand them over the responsibility of brushing their teeth, and you can invest in their favorite cartoon character brush, a timer and pleasant tasting toothpaste to make the process more fun of them. However, you may still need to remind them or ask if they have done it. You can also round them up and do your own flossing and brushing in their presence so you can keep an eye on the way they are doing it. And very importantly, keep on bringing them to the dental clinic every 6 or 12 months as advised by the dentist according to your child’s dental health. Being reminded by the dentist and shown proper brushing technique in the clinic can really help them understand and form good dental hygiene habits.

Dr. Hadeel Omer

Five Minutes with Dr. Hadeel Omer, General Dentist with Special Interest in Oral Surgery

 

1. Where did you start your dentistry career?

I qualified in 2009 as a Dentist with BDS (Honours) from my home country, Sudan. I started my career as a general dentist at the Military hospital in Sudan and a private clinic simultaneously. Following this, I undertook Senior House Officer post in Maxillofacial Surgery at a tertiary hospital in Saudi Arabia. After a few years as a general dentist, I developed a keen interest in Oral Surgery, which led me to pursue postgraduate training at the University of Manchester, UK. I gained valuable surgical experience and awarded a master’s degree in Oral maxillofacial Surgery. Along with this, I achieved the Membership of the Faculty of Dentistry, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland.

After gaining experience in many fields of dentistry, I decided to move to Ireland, and I am very proud to be part of one of the best clinics in Ireland, Pembroke dental . I aim to provide the same professional, high-quality service with a gentle and caring approach to the patients.

 

2. What do you enjoy most about dentistry, and how do you spend your spare time?

 

Dentistry is a personally fulfilling career. I enjoy building up a rapport with my patients. Making them feel the ease, and smile with confidence, is truly rewarding!

 

In my spare time, I enjoy volunteering with local communities and using my dental skills to reach out to the less fortunate people. Back in my home country, I worked for a non-governmental health organization offering treatment for the less fortunate and, I have joined many medical convoys. While studying in the UK, I volunteered with a homeless charity to promote oral health care and preventive dentistry.

 

3. What is the last thing you have done to improve your skills/knowledge?

 

I recently achieved a master’s degree from the prestigious University of Manchester, in Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, it has been a rewarding experience and has improved my clinical and research skills.

 

I regularly watch online webinars, and I have also attended many dental and surgical courses in Ireland, the United Kingdom, Sweden, and the Middle East. I believe that continuous postgraduate education never ends, and it is fundamental to update dental knowledge and skills.

 

4. You particularly enjoy Surgical Exposure of Impacted Canine, can you explain some more about this treatment?

 

Some adult teeth do not erupt in the mouth as they should. Commonly, the canine or eye tooth in the upper jaw, which normally erupts at 13 years of age. It can fail to erupt or develop in the wrong position. When the circumstances are potentially favourable, a relatively minor surgical procedure is done to uncover the tooth and slowly move it into alignment with a chain attached to braces. This procedure has a high success rate and boosts patients’ self-esteem due to an enhanced smile and function.

 

5. What should I do if I knock my tooth out?

 

If your adult tooth is knocked out due to an injury or accident, it does not necessarily mean it is lost for good. Proper emergency action can save the tooth. We advise the patient to pick up the tooth by the broad chewing surface (the crown) only. Rinse it in cold tap water, try either: putting the tooth back in its place and gently bite down on it, or keep the tooth moist by placing it in a cup of milk or inside your mouth, next to your cheek. The patient should see the dentist within 30 minutes for further management and follow-ups. Time is of the essence in this situation so don’t delay in contacting your dentist.

Dr Davina Graham

Five Minutes with Dr Davina Graham, General Dentist

 

 

 

 

 

Where did you start your dentistry career?

 

 

After graduating with honours from Trinity College Dublin in 2012, I moved to Glasgow for a year to follow a postgraduate general practice training scheme .I gained invaluable experience in an excellent practice, where I treated a high number of children and nervous patients. It certainly was a baptism of fire! That experience has served me well over the years. I then moved back home to Kildare and joined another position in general practice, before getting the opportunity to work in Pembroke Dental in 2014, and I’ve been based here ever since. My dental home, you could say.

 

 What do you enjoy most about dentistry and how do you spend your spare time?

 

 

After graduating with honours from Trinity College Dublin in 2012, I moved to Glasgow for a year to follow a postgraduate general practice training scheme .I gained invaluable experience in an excellent practice, where I treated a high number of children and nervous patients. It certainly was a baptism of fire! That experience has served me well over the years. I then moved back home to Kildare and joined another position in general practice, before getting the opportunity to work in Pembroke Dental in 2014, and I’ve been based here ever since. My dental home, you could say.

In my spare time I enjoy cooking, cycling and playing tennis. I like travelling, both for leisure and to do charity work, which I’ve done in both Kenya and Cambodia. I hope to continue this work in the future.

 

 What is that last thing you have done to improve your skills/knowledge?

 

 

I attend courses and conferences regularly to keep up to date with the most recent and minimally invasive treatments and techniques. Digital dentistry is the latest development which has made a huge impact on accuracy and comfort of many treatments, as it eliminates the need for impressions, which many people find uncomfortable. I have trained in the prestigious Eastmann Dental Institute in London in both endodontics and cosmetic dentistry which really added to my skills.

I enjoy orthodontics and recently completed the Invisalign GO course so now I can offer this treatment to my patients who want straighter teeth with the minimum of fuss.

 

I take a lot of medication; do I need to tell my dentist and if so why?

 

 

Yes, it is essential to bring a list of all the medications you are taking, however relevant or irrelevant they seem. So many medications have oral side effects, such as dry mouth, thrush, ulcers and altered taste. Others thin the blood, which may impact how we do extractions. Some medications, especially those for osteoporosis and for cancer treatment, alter how the bone heals, or can lead to huge issues after an extraction. Drugs for the immune system can make you more prone to infections too. Dentists also frequently prescribe antibiotics and painkillers, some of which may interact with medication you are on. So, it is extremely important that you inform your dentist about anything you are taking (even herbal) and if this changes over the years.

 

 Do I need to have dental X-rays taken, are X-rays bad for you?

 

 

Taking x-rays is an important diagnostic tool for dentists. A lot of dental decay and other issues would be missed without x-rays as it gives us information about areas in the mouth and jaws that we otherwise can’t see directly. We simply cannot do our job to the highest degree without the use of dental x-rays. Our dental x-rays are all now digital, so the dose of radiation is extremely low. We only take x-rays when they are justified and under strict guidelines which we adhere to, each and every time. The radiation dose is not anything to worry when taken with proper care and attention.

 

Why are dental treatments so expensive?

 

 

Excellent dentistry takes exceptional skill and time. Expensive equipment, laboratory costs and a large dental team are all part of the dental experience that you don’t see firsthand but are important components of comprehensive dental treatment. Knowledge and individual skills are always being improved on in the form of extra courses- certificates, diplomas and masters degrees. Dentistry has improved a lot over the years, and it is only with continued learning and professional growth that this has be achieved.

Investing in quality treatment always ends up being cost effective in the long term but we have to invest in our facilities, equipment and our staff without government help in order to provide you with the best dental treatment available. This all contributes to the expense of dental treatment, but we do try to help our patients in this regard by facilitating dental payment plans to make the treatment journey more achievable.